Lithuanian students’ choice of university: a consumer value approach by Darija Bartkute

  Increasing competition within the Lithuanian educational market has driven an analysis of the complex decision processes enrollees undergo when selecting a higher education institution (HEI). A number of factors have contributed to accelerating competition among HEIs in Lithuania, including the development of the market economy in Lithuania, the effects of HE policy changes over…

How are they socialized in German academia? An empirical study on Chinese doctoral students by Rui Wu

My study is triggered by two interesting phenomena taking place in the higher education of Germany. First, despite the development of a more structured model of doctoral training, a large number of doctoral students still stay or choose to stay in the traditional master-apprentice-model. Second, although many structural programs akin to the U.S. ones are…

What are the logics of quality assurance in international joint degree programmes? by Gaoming Zheng, Yuzhuo Cai, Shaozhuang Ma

  In the global context of higher education, international joint programmes is a popular and important strategic approach to develop collaborative partnership between institutions, enhance students’ and staff mobility and contribute to joint research and knowledge production. However, as the stakeholders of an international joint programme are from different contexts with different educational practices, the…

Is there reciprocal commitment in employer-employee -relationships in academic careers? by Taru Siekkinen, Kari Kuoppala, Elias Pekkola & Jussi Välimaa

Academic careers are said to be precarious because of their inherent uncertainty especially in the early career stages typically characterized by short and fixed-term work contracts. At the same time, academic work is highly demanding by its nature and requires commitment to the work tasks. In our article “Reciprocal commitment in academic careers? Finnish Implications…

The Norwegian student introductory week: who takes part, and is participation associated with better social integration and satisfaction among students? by Solbjørg Makalani Myrtveit, Kristin Gärtner Askeland, Marit Knapstad, Ann Kristin Knudsen, and Jens Christoffer Skogen

Many new students have recently moved away from their hometowns, and therefore wish to establish new social relations. In countries across the world, starting university is associated with various types of initiation rituals such as the Portuguese Praxe, American hazing, and introductory events in New Zealand, Denmark, and Norway. The Norwegian introductory week aims to…

Researching the rise of ‘higher education regionalisms’ around the world: Suggestions for those in the field by Meng-Hsuan Chou and Pauline Ravinet

Meng-Hsuan Chou (NTU, Singapore) & Pauline Ravinet (University Lille)

Regional policy cooperation in the higher education sector is on the rise, but it remains under-studied. Indeed, beyond Europe’s Bologna Process, an instance of what we refer to as ‘higher education regionalism’ (Chou and Ravinet 2015), developments elsewhere are less examined and rarely compared. In our article ‘The emergent terrains of “higher education regionalism”: How…

Academic marginalism in post-socialist societies – findings from Croatia by Lucia Brajkovic

Lucia Brajkovic (American Council on Education)

  The transformation of higher education in Central and Eastern Europe has occurred within a relatively short period and has been intertwined with broader social and economic changes accompanying the transition from socialist regimes to market-based economies. Most post-socialist countries in the Western Balkans region abolished socialist regimes and survived a devastating civil war over…

What university students think about assessment – reflections from Italy by Serafina Pastore

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Over time, the higher education systems have been exposed to deep and radical transformations. Different processes such as, standardization, diversification, privatization, and internationalization have brought deep institutional changes. Many are the problems that higher education systems have had to deal with: first of all the pervasive attention on teaching-learning quality considered both at institutional and…

Higher education and employability by Cristina Sin

Cristina Sin (Centre for Research in Higher Education policies (CIPES), Portugal)

Since around the turn of the century, the European Council and the European Commission have vigorously promoted the message that universities must enhance graduate employability through the articulation of curricula to labour market needs, through career guidance or through closer cooperation with employers.  The Bologna Process, too, upheld employability as a central objective of its…