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Individuals in Action: Bringing about Innovation in Higher Education by Sandra Hasanefendic, Julie M. Birkholz, Hugo Horta and Peter van der Sijde

Human capital as driver of innovation has long been recognized, and more than ever before, whom you have in your organization matters. Having the right people in higher education is perhaps even more important because universities are struggling to cope with massive changes in global, regional and national socioeconomic landscapes. They need to keep up…

Lithuanian students’ choice of university: a consumer value approach by Darija Bartkute

  Increasing competition within the Lithuanian educational market has driven an analysis of the complex decision processes enrollees undergo when selecting a higher education institution (HEI). A number of factors have contributed to accelerating competition among HEIs in Lithuania, including the development of the market economy in Lithuania, the effects of HE policy changes over…

How are they socialized in German academia? An empirical study on Chinese doctoral students by Rui Wu

My study is triggered by two interesting phenomena taking place in the higher education of Germany. First, despite the development of a more structured model of doctoral training, a large number of doctoral students still stay or choose to stay in the traditional master-apprentice-model. Second, although many structural programs akin to the U.S. ones are…

What are the logics of quality assurance in international joint degree programmes? by Gaoming Zheng, Yuzhuo Cai, Shaozhuang Ma

  In the global context of higher education, international joint programmes is a popular and important strategic approach to develop collaborative partnership between institutions, enhance students’ and staff mobility and contribute to joint research and knowledge production. However, as the stakeholders of an international joint programme are from different contexts with different educational practices, the…

Is there reciprocal commitment in employer-employee -relationships in academic careers? by Taru Siekkinen, Kari Kuoppala, Elias Pekkola & Jussi Välimaa

Academic careers are said to be precarious because of their inherent uncertainty especially in the early career stages typically characterized by short and fixed-term work contracts. At the same time, academic work is highly demanding by its nature and requires commitment to the work tasks. In our article “Reciprocal commitment in academic careers? Finnish Implications…

The Norwegian student introductory week: who takes part, and is participation associated with better social integration and satisfaction among students? by Solbjørg Makalani Myrtveit, Kristin Gärtner Askeland, Marit Knapstad, Ann Kristin Knudsen, and Jens Christoffer Skogen

Many new students have recently moved away from their hometowns, and therefore wish to establish new social relations. In countries across the world, starting university is associated with various types of initiation rituals such as the Portuguese Praxe, American hazing, and introductory events in New Zealand, Denmark, and Norway. The Norwegian introductory week aims to…

Researching the rise of ‘higher education regionalisms’ around the world: Suggestions for those in the field by Meng-Hsuan Chou and Pauline Ravinet

Meng-Hsuan Chou (NTU, Singapore) & Pauline Ravinet (University Lille)

Regional policy cooperation in the higher education sector is on the rise, but it remains under-studied. Indeed, beyond Europe’s Bologna Process, an instance of what we refer to as ‘higher education regionalism’ (Chou and Ravinet 2015), developments elsewhere are less examined and rarely compared. In our article ‘The emergent terrains of “higher education regionalism”: How…